Do Women Need More Sleep Than Men?

Women need more sleep than men, according to a recent study. Researchers from Duke University have discovered that, compared to men, women experience more mental and physical consequences from inadequate rest. Besides giving half the population a legitimate reason to sleep in, the findings could also inspire new health recommendations for women at greater risk of heart disease, depression, and psychological problems.

sleep advice

ver noticed how after a late night out with your man, you have a harder time the next day than he does? It’s not all in your head. Thanks to different hormonal makeups, we suffer more emotionally and physically when we’re short on zzzs.

Sleep is a basic human need, as important for good health as diet and exercise. When we sleep, our bodies rest but our brains are active. Sleep lays the groundwork for a productive day ahead.

The average American adult requires between 7 and 9 hours of sleep every day. That said, 80 percent of the population say they habitually fall short of this quota. To learn more about sleep and improving rest patterns, visit The National Sleep Foundation’s online resources.

During deep sleep, the cortex – the part of the brain responsible for thought, memory, language and so on – disengages from the senses and goes into recovery mode.”The more of your brain you use during the day, the more of it that needs to recover and, consequently, the more sleep you need.

“Women tend to multi-task – they do lots at once and are flexible – and so they use more of their actual brain than men do. Because of that, their sleep need is greater.

During deep sleep, the cortex – the part of the brain responsible for thought, memory, language and so on – disengages from the senses and goes into recovery mode.
‘The more of your brain you use during the day, the more of it that needs to recover and, consequently, the more sleep you need.’

Feeling sleepy during the day or at times you expect to be awake may indicate a need for more sleep, the presence of a serious but treatable disorder such as those already mentioned, or narcolepsy, a chronic neurological disorder that affects approximately one in 2000 people. Narcolepsy symptoms frequently appear in teen years. In addition to excessive daytime sleepiness, people with narcolepsy have sudden “sleep attacks” (an over-whelming urge to sleep),

Finally, don’t forget the recommendations from the National Sleep Foundation  (which you likely can recite in your sleep—or as you stare at the ceiling): Go to bed at the same time every day of the week, avoid heavy meals before bed, establish a relaxing bedtime routine, don’t nap, and exercise daily.

Source : yourmedicalstop.com

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